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Soft Tissue Replacement Implants

  • Joon Bu Park
Chapter
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Abstract

The success of soft tissue implants has primarily been due to the development of synthetic polymers. This is mainly because the polymers can be tailor-made to match the physical and chemical properties of soft tissues. In addition, polymers can be made into various physical forms, such as liquid for filling spaces, fibers for suture materials, films for catheter balloons, I knitted fabrics for blood vessel prostheses, and solid forms for cosmetic and weight-bearing applications.

Keywords

Silicone Rubber Artificial Heart Pyrolytic Carbon Ossicular Chain Tissue Ingrowth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joon Bu Park
    • 1
  1. 1.College of EngineeringUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA

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