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Investigations of Smoking and Related Health Complications and Genotoxic Hazards in a Preventive Medical Population Program in Malmö, Sweden

  • Erik Trell
  • Lars Janzon
  • Rolf Korsgaard
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 30)

Abstract

Malmö is a Swedish city of 230,000 inhabitants, served by one general hospital. Since 1975, there has been an institute of Preventive Medicine integrated within the regular hospital servies at the Medical Department of Malmö General Hospital. The design of the department, as outlined in Fig. 1, seeks to avoid a conveyor-belt type of isolated “health check-ups,” and instead create an ambulatory ward for individual risk factor assessment and intervention. The investigative units can be used in the afternoon as outpatient clinics for further investigation and treatment of the risk factors identified in the screening, e.g., hyperlipidemia and hypertension as outlined in Fig. 2.

Keywords

Chronic Bronchitis Tobacco Consumption Intermittent Claudication Screening Attendee High Induction Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erik Trell
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lars Janzon
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rolf Korsgaard
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Preventive Medicine and Community MedicineUniversity of Lund Malmö General HospitalMalmöSweden
  2. 2.Department of Tumour Cytogenetics The Wallenberg LaboratoryUniversity of LundLundSweden

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