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Ways of Knowing and Visions of Reality in Psychoanalytic Therapy And Behavior Therapy

  • Stanley B. Messer
  • Meir Winokur

Abstract

In an article exploring limits to the integration of psychoanalytic and behavior therapies (Messer & Winokur, 1980), we suggested that the barrier between them resides primarily in the contrasting perspectives on reality and the different visions of life they embody. Psychoanalytic therapists, we argued, focus on the inner world of experience, emphasizing clients’ introspection and subjectivity. By contrast, behavior therapists were seen as more preoccupied with the outer world of consensual reality, approaching clients within a more objective and external framework. We tried to show how these perspectives influence, in turn, the nature of the techniques employed and the treatment goals emphasized in each form of therapy.

Keywords

Behavior Therapist Behavior Therapy Behavioral Approach Psychoanalytic Theory Comic Vision 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley B. Messer
    • 1
  • Meir Winokur
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School of Applied and Professional PsychologyRutgers University, Busch CampusPiscatawayUSA
  2. 2.Student Counseling ServiceHebrew UniversityJerusalemIsrael

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