The Nancy Hanks Years

  • Fannie Taylor
  • Anthony L. Barresi
Part of the Nonprofit Management and Finance book series (IAUS, volume 85)

Abstract

The first decade of the National Endowment for the Arts breaks naturally into two divisions under its successive chairmen. If the first period was exciting, innovative, without a discernible pattern, often narrowly focused but full of promise, the second period began to fulfil the promise, develop patterns, and broaden the commitment to the world of the arts.

Keywords

Marketing Explosive Beach Mane Hunt 

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Reference Notes

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fannie Taylor
    • 1
  • Anthony L. Barresi
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Wisconsin — MadisonMadisonUSA

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