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Self-produced Locomotion

An Organizer of Emotional, Cognitive, and Social Development in Infancy
  • Bennett I. Bertenthal
  • Joseph J. Campos
  • Karen Caplovitz Barrett
Chapter
Part of the Topics in Developmental Psychobiology book series (TDP)

Abstract

A few years ago, Emde, Gaensbauer, and Harmon (1976) highlighted two periods of rapid developmental reorganization in infancy. These periods were characterized by dramatic changes in perceptual, cognitive, and especially emotional functions. The period from 7 to 9 months of age is one of these times of rapid reorganization. It is marked by numerous changes in sensorimotor intelligence, including the beginnings of representation, changes in object permanence, new modes of understanding spatial relationships, more complex forms of imitation, and the beginnings of concept formation. This period also appears to be characterized by a burgeoning of fear: Infants at this age react aversively to separation, strangers, heights, looming stimuli, and various unfamiliar toys and objects (Scarr & Salapatek, 1970). The inverse of fear— security—also begins to be clearly evident. The child becomes capable of using the attachment figure as a “haven of safety” and as a “secure base for exploration” (Ainsworth, 1973; Bowlby, 1969). The important changes taking place in the attachment relationship herald major changes in other social contexts as well, including peer and sibling relationships and sociability to strangers (Campos, Barrett, Lamb, Goldsmith, & Stenberg, 1983).

Keywords

Human Infant Depth Perception Spatial Cognition Spatial Code Object Permanence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bennett I. Bertenthal
    • 1
  • Joseph J. Campos
    • 2
  • Karen Caplovitz Barrett
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Gilmer HallUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of DenverDenverUSA

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