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Preparing the Family for Client Transition

Outreach Parent Training
  • Mary J. Czyzewski
  • Walter P. Christian
  • Mary B. Norris

Abstract

As described by Luce and his colleagues in the previous chapter, client transition cannot be accomplished without an adequate preparation of the client’s future environment. In the case of clients returning to their homes and families, this requires the orientation and training of family members in the procedures that are effective in managing the client’s behavior and in meeting his or her special physiological, psychological, and/or educational needs.

Keywords

Performance Inventory Autistic Child Parent Training Apply Behavior Analysis Residential Facility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary J. Czyzewski
    • 1
  • Walter P. Christian
    • 2
  • Mary B. Norris
    • 2
  1. 1.Kansas Department of Mental Health and Retardation ServicesUniversity of KansasTopekaUSA
  2. 2.The May InstituteChathamUSA

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