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Clonal blood B-cell excess in relation to prognosis in untreated non-leukemic patients With non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL)

  • C. Lindemalm
  • H. Mellstedt
  • P. Biberfeld
  • M. Björkholm
  • B. Christensson
  • G. Holm
  • B. Johansson
Part of the Developments in Oncology book series (DION, volume 32)

Abstract

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) is a heterogeneous group of diseases which in the majority of cases are of B-cell origin [1]. An excess of B-cells carrying the same light chain isotype as the lymph node tumor cells (monoclonal B-lymphocytes) is often present in the blood of patients with normal lymphocyte counts indicating leukemic spread. This is not only seen in patients with advanced clinical stage, but sometimes also in patients with Stages I and II diseases [2–4]. Similar findings have been reported in other B lymphoproliferative disorders, such as multiple myeloma, Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance [5, 6]. If the monoclonal B-lymphocytes belong to the tumor cell clone, the disease is apparently more disseminated than indicated by the clinical stage as determined by usual staging procedures. Such a dissemination may have prognostic implications. In this report, we describe the relation between circulating monoclonal B-lymphocytes and prognosis in non-leukemic NHL patients.

Keywords

Multiple Myeloma Monoclonal Gammopathy Advanced Clinical Stage High Grade Malignancy Tumor Cell Clone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Boston 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Lindemalm
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • H. Mellstedt
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • P. Biberfeld
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • M. Björkholm
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • B. Christensson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • G. Holm
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • B. Johansson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of RadiobiologyRadiumhemmetStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Department of PathologyKarolinska HospitalStockholmSweden
  3. 3.Department of MedicineDanderyd HospitalStockholmSweden
  4. 4.Department of Clinical ImmunologyHuddinge HospitalStockholmSweden

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