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Cloning and Manipulating Cauliflower Mosaic Virus

  • L. K. Dixon
  • T. Hohn
Part of the Developments in Molecular Virology book series (DMVI, volume 5)

Abstract

Most of the several hundred groups of plant viruses identified have an RNA genome, only the geminiviruses and caulimoviruses have DNA genomes. Geminivirus particles are composed of two shells fused together probably at pentameric corners. They contain single-stranded circular DNA, 2–3 Kb in length. As a group, they infect a wide range of mono and dicotolydonous host plants. Two different DNA molecules are necessary for infection by whitefly transmissible bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV; 1), tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV; 2,3) and casava latent virus (CLV; 4). In contrast to these bipartite viruses some of the leafhopper transmissible strains such as chloris striate virus may be monopartite and require only one DNA molecule for infectivity (5). Double-stranded replicative intermediates have been isolated (2,6) and used for molecular cloning.

Keywords

Mosaic Virus Inclusion Body Cauliflower Mosaic Virus Primer Binding Site Minus Strand 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishing, Boston 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. K. Dixon
    • 1
  • T. Hohn
    • 1
  1. 1.Friedrich Miescher InstituteBaselSwitzerland

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