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Key Features of Regional Planning

  • Leland S. Burns
  • John Friedmann
Part of the Environment, Development and Public Policy book series (EDPC)

Abstract

Regional planning has developed along pragmatic lines with relatively little attention to formal theory. It may be premature to expect a fully developed theory in a young and highly disparate field, but it does seem possible to generalize about the common features of regional planning as it has evolved in various countries around the world. Such generalization is not only suggestive of areas for further study but offers the possibility of illuminating a path through the confusing reality with which we must deal. The emphasis here is on problems of broad-scale regional planning, including both urban and rural activities, in developing situations.

Keywords

Regional Planning Metropolitan Region Regional Program Growth Pole Regional Account 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Friedmann and Alonso, eds., Regional Development and Planning. Part I (Cambridge, Mass.: The M.I.T. Press, 1964), pp. 704–706.Google Scholar
  2. Victor L. Urquidi, Free Trade and Economic Integration in Latin America (Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1962)Google Scholar
  3. Miguel S. Wionczek, Latin American Free Trade Association (New York: Conciliation, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 1965)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leland S. Burns
    • 1
  • John Friedmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Architecture and Urban PlanningUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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