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Elimination of Graft Versus Host Disease in Matched Allogeneic Leukemic Transplant Recipients Using Campath-1

  • S. Slavin
  • R. Or
  • L. Weiss
  • D. Steiner-Zalz
  • G. Cividalli
  • C. Brautbar
  • Z. Weshler
  • E. Galun
  • S. Samuels
  • D. Galili
  • M. Ephros
  • M. Shapiro
  • G. Hale
  • H. Waldmann

Abstract

Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) offers one of the major advances in the treatment of certain malignant hematological disorders for which no specific effective alternative therapeutic modality exists, particularly leukemias. Although results of BMT in man have improved over the last few years, success rates have been limited mainly due to the reactivity of the graft against the host, a disease called graft versus host disease (GVHD). None of the treatment modalities studied thus far seems to be effective against established GVHD. Therefore, it appears that prevention of GVHD is the best approach to overcome the obstacle of GVHD. Since experimental data and recent pilot clinical studies suggest that acute GVHD results from donor type mature T cells present in the marrow aspirate (1–9), it would seem that the safest way to prevent GVHD is by elimination of T cells from the marrow allograft prior to transplantation. The present report summarizes our initial results in trying to prevent GVHD in patients undergoing BMT for leukemia using a monoclonal anti-lymphocyte antibody, CAMPATH-1 (10). Two major advantages of this novel antibody are: 1) its ability to deplete all lymphoid cells, including T cells, without damaging the stem cell compartment; and, 2) the unique characteristic of this antibody to bind human complement.

Keywords

Bone Marrow Transplantation Graft Versus Host Disease Stem Cell Compartment Acute Graft Versus Host Disease Poietic Stem Cell Transplantation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Slavin
    • 1
  • R. Or
    • 1
  • L. Weiss
    • 1
  • D. Steiner-Zalz
    • 2
  • G. Cividalli
    • 3
  • C. Brautbar
    • 4
  • Z. Weshler
    • 5
  • E. Galun
    • 1
  • S. Samuels
    • 1
  • D. Galili
    • 6
  • M. Ephros
    • 7
  • M. Shapiro
    • 7
  • G. Hale
    • 8
  • H. Waldmann
    • 8
  1. 1.The Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cryopreservation Unit and The Immunobiology Research Laboratory, Departments of Medicine AUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  2. 2.HematologyUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  3. 3.PediatricsUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  4. 4.Tissue Typing UnitUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  5. 5.Radiation TherapyUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  6. 6.Hospital Oral Medicine ServiceUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  7. 7.Clinical MicrobiologyUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  8. 8.The Department of PathologyHadassah University HospitalJerusalemIsrael

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