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Interaction of High Endothelial Venules with T and B Cells after Antigenic Stimulation

  • G. Kraal
  • A. Twisk

Abstract

The migration of lymphocytes into lymph nodes and Peyer’s patches is controlled by interaction with the specialized endothelium of postcapillary, high endothelial venules (HEV). This selective interaction was studied by Butcher et al. using short-term in vivo homing studies and in vitro HEV adherence assays1,2. It was suggested that the limited organ preferences shown by most T and B cells as well as by T cell subsets can be explained by expression of different proportions of peripheral node and Peyer’s patch specific receptors1–4. Further indications for such dual receptor specificity have come from the development of a monoclonal antibody, MEL-14, specific for the lymphocyte receptor mediating the recognition of peripheral node HEV’s5.

Keywords

Lymph Node Mesenteric Lymph Node Antigenic Stimulation Peripheral Lymph Node High Endothelial Venule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1958

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Kraal
    • 1
  • A. Twisk
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Histology, Medical FacultyFree UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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