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The Long-Lasting State of Specific Nonresponsiveness Induced By Intravenous Immunization with Alloantigens is Due to the Generation of Recirculating Suppressor T Cells

  • A. T. J. Bianchi
  • L. M. Hussaarts-Odijk
  • H. Bril
  • H. de Ruiter
  • R. Benner

Summary

We investigated whether the long-lasting state of nonresponsiveness that is induced by intravenous immunization with alloantigens is mediated by suppressor T cells, or is caused by inactivation or deletion of the relevant alloreactive T cell clones. The data from parabiosis and thoracic duct drainage experiments suggest that the state of nonresponsiveness depends on recirculating non-proliferating Ts memory cells.

Keywords

Spleen Cell Thoracic Duct Delay Type Hypersensitivity Naive Mouse Delay Type Hypersensitivity Response 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. T. J. Bianchi
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. M. Hussaarts-Odijk
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Bril
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. de Ruiter
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Benner
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Cell Biology and GeneticsErasmus University RotterdamLelystadThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Dept. of ImmunologyCentral Veterinary InstituteLelystadThe Netherlands

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