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Secretory Functions of the Mononuclear Phagocyte

  • W. A. Scott
  • N. A. Pawlowski
  • E. B. Cramer
  • Z. A. Cohn

Abstract

The functional properties of mononuclear phagocytes include their well-known capacities for phagocytosis and pinocytosis. Work in recent years has provided greater understanding of the effector functions of these cells; in particular, their secretory nature. The versality of the macrophage has been a surprise; over 50 secretory products including mediators, cytocidal factors, and growth-promoting agents have been identified and triggers for some activities described.

Keywords

Mononuclear Phagocyte Secretory Function Lipoxygenase Pathway Eicosatetraenoic Acid Hamster Cheek Pouch 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. A. Scott
    • 1
    • 2
  • N. A. Pawlowski
    • 1
  • E. B. Cramer
    • 3
  • Z. A. Cohn
    • 1
  1. 1.The Rockefeller UniversityUSA
  2. 2.The Institute for Medical ResearchPrincetonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Anatomy and Cell BiologyDownstate Medical CenterBrooklynUSA

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