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An Optimal Approach for the Selection of Appropriate Sanitation Technology for Developing Countries

  • Abul Basher Mohammed Shahalam

Abstract

The selection of an appropriate sanitation technology in terms of its definition (Elmendorf and Buckles, 1980),’a method or technique which provides a socially and environmentally acceptable level of service or quality of project with full health benefits and at the least economic cost,’ is a decision problem. The foundation stones for a selection process especially suitable for developing countries were laid by a series of efforts on the part of the World Bank and USAID agencies (Kalbermatten et al., 1980a, 1980b; Mara et al., 1980; Feachem et al., 1980; Reid and Coffey, 1978). The algorithm developed through the World Bank studies (Kalbermatten et al., 1980) emphasizes physical factors related to the given area, water supply and cost considerations. The background data collected on the subject include health, social, behavioral, institutional and environmental information. In the selection process, the last mentioned factors are treated indirectly.

Keywords

Planning Period None None Sanitation Facility Sanitation System Feasible Technology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abul Basher Mohammed Shahalam
    • 1
  1. 1.Yarmouk UniversityIrbidJordan

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