Structural Aspects of Cigarette Smoke-Induced Pulmonary Disease

  • P. K. Jefferey
  • D. F. Rogers
  • M. M. Ayers
  • P. A. Shields
Part of the Ettore Majorana International Science Series book series (PSLI)

Abstract

Smoking is the most important cause of preventable early death and loss of working time in the United Kingdom. Two out of five heavy smokers die before they are 65 - double the proportion of non-smokers. The most serious risk of smoking is lung cancer which kills over 38,000 people each year in the United Kingdom 80% of them men. The association of lung cancer, particularly squamous cell carcinoma, and cigarette smoking is clear cut. The death rate from the disease in heavy smokers is 30 times that in non-smokers. Other smoking-related pulmonary diseases of major significance are chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Asthma is exacerbated by smoking but is not caused by it. The pathologist faces the difficulty of only seeing the later stages in the natural history of each disease but by careful comparison of clinical material and the use of experimental animal models correlations of structure and function can be made and pathogenesis established. The structural parameters and the diseases to which they relate which will be discussed herein are: (i) mucosal sensitivity (asthma and bronchitis); (ii) cilia and mucus (bronchitis); (iii) phagocytic cells (emphysema) and (iv) squamous metaplasia/atypia (carcinoma).

Keywords

Permeability Surfactant Arsenic Influenza Aspirin 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. K. Jefferey
    • 1
  • D. F. Rogers
    • 1
  • M. M. Ayers
    • 1
  • P. A. Shields
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Lung PathologyBrompton HospitalLondonEngland

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