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Some Trends in Ligand Methods, Including Fluoroimmunoassay

  • J. Landon
Part of the Methodological Surveys in Biochemistry and Analysis book series (MSBA, volume 14)

Abstract

Ligand assays depend upon the reversible, non-covalent binding between a specific binding protein and the ligand. The binding protein can be a receptor, a circulating binding protein (such as transcortin for the assay of cortisol) or an antiserum. Antisera, produced for immunoassays, now dominate because of the specificity and sensitivity that are possible and the ability to raise antisera against a vast range of small and large molecules.

Keywords

Large Molecule Fluorescein Isothiocyanate Separation Step Vast Range Immunoradiometric Assay 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Landon
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical PathologySt. Bartholomew’s HospitalLondonUK

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