Molecular Biology of Pseudorabies Virus

  • Tamar Ben-Porat
  • Albert S. Kaplan
Part of the The Viruses book series (VIRS)

Abstract

Pseudorabies virus (PRV) causes a natural infection in swine similar to that of herpes simplex virus (HSV) in man, and B virus in monkeys. Sabin (1934) was the first to recognize that these viruses are naturally related. As Sabin put it, “Their generic relationship may perhaps be based on the following properties, which, taken together, are not possessed by any other virus: (a) they are pantropic, i. e., they have affinities for cells derived from all embryonic layers; (b) they are neuroinvasive, i. e., they are capable of invading the central nervous system from a peripheral focus; (c) they give rise to a similar intranuclear body; (d) they have a similar, though not identical, range of susceptible hosts; and (e) they appear to have a partial immunological relationship.” Later studies established that PRV is indeed a herpesvirus, as determined by a variety of morphological, biological, and biochemical characteristics. To this may be added the fact, established by Shope (1935), that PRV is latent in swine, its natural host, as HSV is in man.

Keywords

Sedimentation Interferon Arginine Trypsin Choline 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tamar Ben-Porat
    • 1
  • Albert S. Kaplan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyVanderbilt University School of MedicineNashvilleUSA

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