Psychiatry pp 283-291 | Cite as

The Family as Victim: Mental Health Implications

  • Charles R. Figley

Abstract

My colleagues at this symposium (cf, Eitinger, Frederick, Harnois) have discussed in their papers the immediate and long-term mental health consequences of victimization for the victim. My contribution to this discussion is to focus my attention on the family of the victim and to explicate two major axioms: First, that the family is the key factor in facilitating the emotional recovery of the victim; and second, that family members experience victimization themselves when another family member becomes a victim.

Keywords

Transportation Diarrhea Abate Sonal 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles R. Figley
    • 1
  1. 1.Child and Family Research InstitutePurdue UniversityW. LafayetteUSA

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