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General Principles of Analytical Mass Spectrometry

  • R. K. Boyd

Abstract

The purpose of this introductory chapter is to set the stage for what is to follow. Clearly, it is not possible to give a complete account of all the features of a modern mass spectrometer in a few pages. Accordingly, we shall concentrate on establishing some essential principles, give references to sources of more detailed information, and try to give some indication of more modern trends in instrumentation. Some of these trends will be fully described in later chapters in this book and thus will be treated sketchily here.

Keywords

Magnetic Sector Quadrupole Mass Filter Field Desorption Quadrupole Analyzer Soft Ionization Technique 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. K. Boyd
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of GuelphGuelphCanada

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