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A Hypersensitive Serotonergic Receptor Theory of Depression: The Role of Stress

  • M. H. Aprison
  • Joseph N. Hingtgen
Part of the Topics in the Neurosciences book series (TNSC, volume 2)

Abstract

There is an ever increasing body of evidence, both from the animal laboratory and clinical studies which suggests that stress may provoke psychotic depression through the mechanism of neurotransmitter depletion. This hypothesis has been strengthened by the newer concept of hypersensitive postsynaptic receptors, especially with regard to the serotonergic system, which our laboratory has been studying since 1960. This work, based on our animal model, provides evidence that should be seriously considered in any attempt to understand the chemistry of affective disorders.

Keywords

Gastric Lesion Serotonergic System Serotonergic Receptor Behavioral Stress Behavioral Depression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Matinus Nijhoff Publishing, Boston 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. H. Aprison
    • 1
  • Joseph N. Hingtgen
    • 1
  1. 1.Section of Applied and Theoretical Neurobiology, The Institute of Psychiatric Research and Departments of Psychiatry and Biochemistry, Indiana University School of MedicineIndiana University Medical CenterIndianapolisUSA

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