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Red blood cell polyamines in malignant glioma patients. Spermidine and spermine blood levels and tumour evolution

  • J. Ph Moulinoux
  • V. Quemener
  • H. Hercouet
  • F. Darcel
  • M. Chatel

Abstract

The data presented in this study are in favour of the clinical interest of RBC polyamine determination in the monitoring of patients harboring anaplastic gliomas: 1) In the case of tumor progression, RBC spermidine levels, and spermine levels to some extent, seem closely associated with the modification of TDM images. 2) In the case of clinical deterioration, an increase of RBC spermidine levels significantly higher than those of controls was observed, but constantly correlated to those of erythrocyte spermine concentrations. 3) All patients with a Karnofsky (K) index ≤S5O related to tumor progression show straight regression lines with slopes superior to 1.80 (in this study). 4) In the presence of a patient with normal values of RBC polyamine levels, clinical and/or TDM arguments of tumor progression have to be reconsidered. If RBC polyamine levels appear in neurooncology as a rather reliable index of tumor cell proliferation, the treatment strategy of patients harboring anaplastic gliomas could be more biologically adapted, according to the importance in each patient of the intracranial hyperplastic level at the time of therapy.

Keywords

red blood cell polyamines malignant glioma tumour evolution 

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Copyright information

© Martinas Nijhoff Publishers, Boston 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Ph Moulinoux
    • 1
  • V. Quemener
    • 1
  • H. Hercouet
    • 1
  • F. Darcel
    • 2
  • M. Chatel
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Cytologie, Génétique et HormonologieCentre Hospitalier Universitaire de RennesFrance
  2. 2.Service de Neurologie et Laboratoire de Neuro pathologieRennes CedexFrance

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