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Carbon dioxide laser surgery for malignant glioma

  • Mitsuhiro Hara
  • Tatsuhiro Maeda
  • Hitoshi Yokota
  • Motohide Ogashiwa
  • Junichiro Okada
  • Kazuo Takeuchi
  • Masahisa Matsumoto

Abstract

21 cases of malignant glioma have been operated (total 33 operations) on with a Co, laser.

Two typical cases was presented and the laser surgery involved described. Parenchymal hemorrhaging from the tumor was controlled with defocused laser beam. And the tumor was vaporized with a laser very effectively in a short time. Postoperative CT showed neither tumor shadow nor increased cerebral edema, implying total resection of the tumor.

Based on the analysis of Daumas-Duport 3-D configuration classification of gliomas, the usefulness of the laser each type of our cases was evaluated microscopically.

In the Type 1 (glioma which appear as tumor tissue proper, with either no or very limited infiltration beyond the main core of the tumor), recurrence cannot be prevented even with laser surgery.

But the laser vaporized as much as malignant area of the tumor as possible while limiting the influence of such surgery on normal tissue in short time. After this procedure, adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy) are resorted to either prevent a recurrence or exacerbation of the tumor remaining, and thereby prolong the life of the patient.

In the surgical operation of malignant glioma, it is important to remove as much malignant area of the tumor as possible while limiting the influence of such surgery on normal tissue. To satisfy such requirements the tumor can be effectively removed with a carbon dioxide laser unit.

We have carried out this procedure in cases of various malignant gliomas during the past six years and have attempted to evaluate the usefulness of this laser surgery based on our experiences.

Key words

Co2laser glioma 

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Copyright information

© Martinas Nijhoff Publishers, Boston 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mitsuhiro Hara
    • 1
  • Tatsuhiro Maeda
    • 1
  • Hitoshi Yokota
    • 1
  • Motohide Ogashiwa
    • 1
  • Junichiro Okada
    • 1
  • Kazuo Takeuchi
    • 1
  • Masahisa Matsumoto
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryKyorin University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of NeurosurgeryCentral Hospital of the Japanese National RailwaysTokyoJapan

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