The Influence of Thromboxane Receptor Blockade on Platelet Uptake in Dacron Grafts in Man

  • Ian Lane
  • Marion Sinclair
  • Keith Poskitt
  • Charles McCollum

Abstract

Human prosthetic vascular grafts do not sustain a growth of endothelium on the luminal surface and remain thrombogenic indefinitely1. Whilst large diameter aortic grafts develop a thin layer of platelet thrombus as pseudointima, smaller prostheses such as those in the femoro-popliteal position have a thrombosis and occlusion rate approaching 60% at 1 year after implantation2. Platelet inhibitory therapy is established in the prevention of thrombosis but the combination of aspirin plus dipyridamole produces frequent gastro-intestinal side effects. This has been shown in the recent Persantin Aspirin Re-infarction Study3 where 25% of patients had to discontinue aspirin therapy. Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) which is a product of aracidonic acid metabolism, is a powerful stimulator of platelet aggregation4. It is produced by enzymes including cyclo-oxygenase and thromboxane synthetase in platelets and the natural biological opponent of TXA2 is prostocyclin (PGI2).

Keywords

Placebo Iodine Aspirin Luminal Polytetrafluoroethylene 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian Lane
    • 1
  • Marion Sinclair
    • 1
  • Keith Poskitt
    • 1
  • Charles McCollum
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryCharing Cross HospitalLondonUK

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