Advertisement

Amyloidosis pp 559-565 | Cite as

The Life Span of Patients with Primary (AL) Amyloidosis and the Effect of Colchicine Treatment

  • Alan S. Cohen
  • Alan Rubinow
  • Herbert Kayne
  • Caryn Libbey
  • Martha Skinner
  • John Mason

Abstract

There is no specific treatment for any variety of amyloidosis [1]. Primary (AL) amyloidosis, now the more commonly seen form of the disorder, usually has a poor prognosis and short life expectancy [2]. Colchicine, which effectively prevents acute fibril attacks in patients with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), a condition that predisposes to amyloidosis, has been shown to block amyloid production in the mouse model [3,4]. In addition, reports indicate that patients with FMF receiving colchicine no longer develop amyloidosis and suggest improvement in some amyloidotic patients with this form of AA amyloid [5, 6].

Keywords

Familial Mediterranean Fever Colchicine Treatment Short Life Expectancy Cancer Treatment Report General Clinical Research Center 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    A. S. Cohen, New Engl. J. Med., 277:522, 574, 628 (1967).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    R. A. Kyle and E. D. Baird, Medicine, 54:271 (1975).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    I. Kedar, et al., Israel J. Med. Sci., 10:787 (1974).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    T. Shirahama and A. S. Cohen, J. Exp. Med., 140:1102 (1974).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    D. Zemer, et al., in: Amyloid and Amyloidosis (G. G. Glenner, P. Costa, and F. Freitas, eds.), Excerpta Medica, pp. 584–586 (1980).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    D. Zemer et al., New Engl. J. Med., 294:170 (1976).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    R. A. Kyle and E. D. Baird, Mayo Clin. Proc., 54:271 (1975).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    E. A. Gehan, Cancer Treatment Reports, 66:1089 (1982).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    H. Sacks et al., Amer. J. Med., 72:233 (1982).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    L. E. Moses, New Engl. J. Med., 311:705 (1984).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    E. A. Gehan and E. J. Freireich, New Engl. J. Med., 290:198 (1974).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    A. S. Cohen et al., Revue de rhumatisme, XVth International Congress of Rheumatology, June 1981, p. 1171.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    A. Rubinow et al., Arthritis Rheum., 24:S124 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    R. A. Kyle and P. R. Greipp, Mayo Clin. Proc., 58:665 (1983).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    J. R. Wright and E. Calkins, Medicine, 60:429 (1981).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    W. F. Barth et al., Amer. J. Med., 47:259 (1969).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    K. Brandt et al., Amer. J. Med., 44:955 (1968).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    A. I. Pick et al., Acta Hematol., 66:154 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    A. S. Cohen et al., Submitted for publication.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan S. Cohen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Alan Rubinow
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Herbert Kayne
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Caryn Libbey
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Martha Skinner
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • John Mason
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.The Thorndike Memorial LaboratoryBoston City HospitalUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineBoston City HospitalUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineBoston University School of MedicineBostonUSA
  4. 4.Department of PharmacologyBoston University School of MedicineBostonUSA

Personalised recommendations