Advertisement

Trying to Stop Smoking

A Decision-Making Perspective
  • Stephen Sutton
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (ABBI, volume 13)

Abstract

The theoretical perspective that guides this chapter is that processes of change in the domain of addictive behaviors can be understood in terms of individuals’ decisions based on evaluating the possible outcomes of the courses of action available to them. The key decision is seen as one of whether or not to try to change one’s behavior (e.g., to try to stop smoking, to try to reduce one’s consumption of alcohol, to try to lose weight). Once the person has embarked on such an attempt, he or she will be faced repeatedly with another decision, namely whether to persevere with the attempt, often in spite of unpleasant withdrawal symptoms, or whether to abandon it. It is an unfortunate fact that the decision to try to change can always be deferred and, when acted on, can be revoked at any time.

Keywords

Lung Cancer Subjective Probability Addictive Behavior Stop Smoking Strong Intention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Edwards, W. (1954). The theory of decision making. Psychological Bulletin, 51, 380–417.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Marsh, A., & Matheson, J. (1983). Smoking attitudes and behaviour. London: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office.Google Scholar
  3. Sutton, S. R. (1979). Can subjective expected utility (SEU) theory explain smokers’ decisions to try to stop smoking? In D. J. Oborne, Gruneberg, M. M., & Eiser, J. R. (Eds.), Research in psychology and medicine (pp. 94–101 ). London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  4. Sutton, S. R., & Eiser, J. R. (1984). The effect of fear-arousing communications on cigarette smoking: An expectancy-value approach. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 7, 13–33.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Sutton
    • 1
  1. 1.Addiction Research UnitInstitute of PsychiatryLondonEngland

Personalised recommendations