Herpes Simplex Virus and Immunity

  • Steven Specter
Part of the University of South Florida International Biomedical Symposia Series book series (USFIBSS)

Abstract

The interactions between herpes simplex virus (HSV) and the host immune system have been extensively investigated both in man and experimental animals. HSV may serve in these interactions as, (1) an antigen to stimulate specific immune responses to the virus, (2) an immune suppressive agent, initiating both specific and non-specific depression of immune reactivity, and (3) a non-specific stimulant of host defense responses. Each role for HSV will be examined and the mechanism(s) responsible for each will be discussed.

Keywords

Migration Toxicity Depression Agarose Influenza 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven Specter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical Microbiology and ImmunologyUniversity of South Florida College of MedicineTampaUSA

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