Recent U.S. Traffic Fatality Trends

  • James H. Hedlund

Abstract

From 1980 to 1983, United States traffic fatalities dropped 17%, from 51 091 to an estimated 42 600. Although there are no clear explanations for this abrupt decline, the major reasons suggested all involve some behavioral change. This paper describes the fatality changes briefly, investigates several potential causes, discusses what must be done to provide more conclusive answers, and considers the implications for traffic safety in 1984 and beyond.

Keywords

Transportation Income Gasoline Mellon 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Cerrelli E., The 1983 Traffic Fatalities—Early Assessment, U.S. Department of Transportation, DOT-HS-806–541, 1984.Google Scholar
  2. Hedlund J., Arnold R., Cerrelli E., Partyka S., Hoxie P., and Skinner D., An Assessment of the 1982 Traffic Fatality Decrease, Accid. Anal. Prev., 16, 1984.Google Scholar
  3. Hoxie P. Skinner D., A Statistical Analysis of the Socio-Economic Influences on Three Groups of High Risk Fatalities, U.S. Department of Transportation, to appear (1985)Google Scholar
  4. Hoxie P., Skinner D., and Wang G., Socio-Economic Influences on Highway Fatalities: An Empirical Investigation, U.S. Department of Transportation, DOT-HS-8Q6-525, 1984.Google Scholar
  5. Partyka S ., Simple Models of Fatality Trends Using Employment and Population Data, Accid. Anal. Prev. 76, 211–222, 1984CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Van Dyke J., and Springer G., Restraint Usage and Effectiveness as Estimated from U.S. Accident Files and Observational Surveys, Proc. Ninth Experimental Safety Vehicle Conference, 696–707, 1982Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • James H. Hedlund
    • 1
  1. 1.National Center for Statistics and Analysis National Highway Traffic Safety AdministrationWashington, DCUSA

Personalised recommendations