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Photodynamic Therapy

  • Thomas J. Dougherty
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 193)

Abstract

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the action of light on a photosensitizer retained in malignant or other diseased tissues. Application to treatment of cancer in man depends upon relative selective retention in the tumor, low systemic toxicity and the ability of the activating light to reach the diseased site.

Keywords

Photodynamic Therapy Sister Chromatid Exchange Light Dose Superficial Bladder Cancer Hematoporphyrin Derivative 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas J. Dougherty
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation MedicineRoswell Park Memorial InstituteUSA

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