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Intracellular Translocation of Inorganic Particles

  • Arnold R. Brody
  • Lila H. Hill
  • Thomas W. Hesterberg
  • J. Carl Barrett
  • Kenneth B. Adler
Chapter

Abstract

A variety of inorganic particles may be inhaled during environmental or occupational exposures. A number of studies with animals have shown that inhaled toxic particles such as silica (Brody et al., 1982) and asbestos (Brody et al., 1981; Brody and Hill, 1982) accumulate in the lung interstitium soon after exposure. The presence of interstitial asbestos is known to induce the progression of fibrotic scarring (Selikoff and Lee, 1978) by undefined mechanisms.

Keywords

Alveolar Epithelial Cell Inorganic Particle Alveolar Epithelium Asbestos Fiber Tracheal Epithelial Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arnold R. Brody
    • 1
  • Lila H. Hill
    • 1
  • Thomas W. Hesterberg
    • 1
  • J. Carl Barrett
    • 1
  • Kenneth B. Adler
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Pulmonary PathobiologyNational Institute of Environmental Health SciencesUSA
  2. 2.Department of PathologyUniversity of VermontBurlingtonUSA

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