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Prostaglandins and Defects in Vascular Function

  • Dennis B. McNamara
  • John A. Bellan
  • Philip R. Mayeux
  • Morris D. Kerstein
  • Albert L. Hyman
  • Philip J. Kadowitz
  • Daniel S. Rush
Part of the Developments in Cardiovascular Medicine book series (DICM, volume 67)

Abstract

Atherosclerotic arterial lesions have been reported to exhibit altered arachidonic acid metabolism (1–4). These alterations have consistently involved decreases in arterial prostacyclin (prostaglandin I2 or PGI2) synthesis; arterial thromboxane A2 (TXA2) formation (3) and increased PGE2 formation (2) have also been associated with atherosclerotic lesions. Conversely, it has been recently reported that total urinary excretion of 2,3-dinor-6-keto-PGFlα, one of the metabolites of PGI2 produced. in vivo, is higher in patients with severe atherosclerosis than normal subjects (5). It was suggested that there was an increase in PGI2 formation due to stimulation of PGI2 synthetase as there may be increased platelet-endothelial interactions in patients with severe atherosclerosis. The present study reports that there are graduated decreases in human arterial PGI2 synthetase activity within atherosclerotic plaque but that these decreases are focal, as the arterial regions immediately adjacent to the plaque exhibit normal PGI2 synthetase activity.

Keywords

Carotid Plaque Severe Atherosclerosis Arterial Region Carotid Artery Plaque Human Carotid Artery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis B. McNamara
    • 1
  • John A. Bellan
    • 1
  • Philip R. Mayeux
    • 1
  • Morris D. Kerstein
    • 2
  • Albert L. Hyman
    • 2
  • Philip J. Kadowitz
    • 1
  • Daniel S. Rush
    • 2
  1. 1.Tulane University School of MedicineNew OrleansUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Pharmacology and SurgeryTulane University School of MedicineNew OrleansUSA

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