Order Rules the World: Our Children in the Communal Society of the Hutterites

  • G. E. Huntington

Abstract

“There are four playhouses, but I’ve only seen three of them and I think this one is the best. They have three girls in it but only two girls own it. They have a dresser, a high chair, a couch, a bed which is somewhat like a couch, a table, a washing basin and a lot of other things. But what I found most interesting was that on their dresser they had some colorless nail polish, and also hidden underneath a little drape of material there were two pairs of high heels…. The playhouse belongs to Barbara (age twelve) who has the keys and to Theresa (age nine) who just went along with her, who does not own a pair of keys but is allowed to go in whenever she wants. They have doll beds and a chest for dolls and a chest for their own clothes, that they use for dress-up. ”

This was our nine-year-old daughter reporting into the tape recorder. In the course of the summer, she reported on the changing cliques when the little girls locked one another out of the playhouses and on how the excluded child suffered the loneliness of not being accepted by the peer group. Our daughter described how the school girls put on high heels and talked in loud voices as do “ugly, worldy women. ” She reported when they played doctor--everyone was the doctor, everyone was the patient.

Keywords

Dine Boulder Abate Sonal Verse 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. E. Huntington
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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