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Developmental Neuropharmacology: Clinical and Neurochemical Perspectives on the Regulation of Attention, Learning, and Movement

  • J. Gerald Young
  • Jeffrey M. Halperin
  • Leonard I. Leven
  • Bennett A. Shaywitz
  • Donald J. Cohen

Abstract

Pharmacological agents are typically grouped according to their target diseases, chemical structures, or molecular mechanisms of action. Categorization of drugs according to their use in the treatment of specific diseases is most common in clinical practice, but a disease-oriented classification requires thoughtful consideration during childhood. Development compromises the nomenclature for childhood Psychiatric disorders. The features of an illness are continuous variables which are the result of the timing and nature of an insult, subsequent maturational processes, and environmental molding. The clinician makes his observations at relatively few cross-sectional points and is unable to reliably estimate the relative contributions of these factors. These diagnostic problems crucially affect our understanding of drugs acting on the central nervous system, so the examination of developmental influences on drug effects has become a major topic for pediatric psychopharmacology.

Keywords

Tourette Syndrome Child Psychiatry Attention Deficit Disorder Hyperactive Child Minimal Brain Dysfunction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Gerald Young
    • 1
  • Jeffrey M. Halperin
    • 1
  • Leonard I. Leven
    • 1
  • Bennett A. Shaywitz
    • 2
  • Donald J. Cohen
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryMount Sinai School of Medicine of the City University of New YorkNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Pediatrics and NeurologyYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  3. 3.Departments of Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and PsychologyYale University School of Medicine and the Child Study CenterNew HavenUSA

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