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Proteins pp 771-777 | Cite as

The Proteins in Avian Eggs: A Test of Protein Separation Methods Based On HPLC

  • R. W. Burley
  • J. F. Back

Abstract

A study has been made of the separation of egg proteins by high-pressure-liquid chromatography (HPLC). Proteins in four parts of the egg were studied:
  1. (i)

    The vitelline membrane. A CI8 column was suitable for separating six proteins from the outer layer of this membrane. Three of these were isolated and partial N-terminal sequences determined on a gas-phase sequencer. One proved to be egg lysozyme; another VMOI (vitelline membrane outer I) and the third has been named VMOII.

     
  2. (ii)

    Egg yolk low density lipoprotein. The apoproteins from this lipoprotein were separated on a phenyl hydrophobic column using a gradient of acidic urea. The results were similar to those obtained with phenyl Sepharose.

     
  3. (iii)

    Egg yolk livetins. A column of DEAE — 5 PW was used to separate the main proteins using an ionic-strength gradient. A comparison was made with blood serum.

     
  4. (iv)

    Albumen (i.e. egg white). The same column was used with the same eluant, which separated the main egg-white proteins.

     

For each of these analyses the samples required a minimum of preparation.

Keywords

Vitelline Membrane Albumen Protein CSIRO Division Blood Serum Protein Urea Gradient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. W. Burley
    • 1
  • J. F. Back
    • 1
  1. 1.CSIRO Division of Food ResearchNorth RydeAustralia

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