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MOSFET Scaling by CADDET

  • Kit Man Cham
  • Soo-Young Oh
  • John L. Moll
  • Keunmyung Lee
  • Paul Vande Voorde
  • Daeje Chin
Part of the The Kluwer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (SECS, volume 53)

Abstract

The density and performance of integrated circuits have increased by many orders of magnitude through the process of device scaling. As pointed out in the overview chapter, the long channel relations are not strictly valid for horizontal dimensions that are comparable to the vertical dimensions. In this example, the operating voltage is kept constant. The horizontal dimension, L eff , and the vertical dimension, T ax , will be separately scaled to approximately two-thirds of the established process values. The two scaling factors are not identical, but are in the typical scaling range. The result of this reduction is then established. Comparison with the long-channel scaling assumptions is possible, and the importance of secondary physical effects can be seen. Device width will not be scaled, the current drive capability will be expressed for a fixed width. Breakdown and punchthrough voltages must be sufficiently greater than the supply voltage so that reliability is not a problem. For this example, power density is not a limitation.

Keywords

Channel Length Drain Current Implantation Dosage Implantation Energy Mode Device 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kit Man Cham
    • 1
  • Soo-Young Oh
    • 1
  • John L. Moll
    • 1
  • Keunmyung Lee
    • 1
  • Paul Vande Voorde
    • 1
  • Daeje Chin
    • 2
  1. 1.Hewlett-Packard LaboratoriesUK
  2. 2.Samsung SemiconductorUK

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