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Leishmaniasis pp 189-206 | Cite as

Leishmaniasis Research in Kenya: Parasite-Vector-Host Associations

  • P. Lawyer
  • J. Githure
  • Y. Mebrahtu
  • P. Perkins
  • R. Muigai
  • J. Leeuwenburg
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 171)

Abstract

Clinically speaking, there are 2 types of leishmaniasis in Kenya, visceral leishmaniasis, or kala-azar, caused by Leishmania donovani and cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. aethiopica, L. major, L. tropica (a recent discovery), and L. donovani (post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis). These will each be discussed from a historical perspective, then from a perspective of current research on Leishmania parasite-vector-host associations.

Keywords

Visceral Leishmaniasis Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Kenya Medical Research Institute Cellulose Acetate Electrophoresis Leishmanin Skin Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Lawyer
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Githure
    • 1
  • Y. Mebrahtu
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. Perkins
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Muigai
    • 1
  • J. Leeuwenburg
    • 1
  1. 1.Kenya Medical Research InstituteNairobiKenya
  2. 2.U.S. Army Medical Research Unit-KenyaA.P.O. New YorkUSA

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