Genetic and Developmental Responses of Radiation Sensitive Mutants of the Nematode, C. elegans, to Ultraviolet, High and Low LET Radiation

  • Thomas Coohill
  • Tamara Marshall
  • Wayne Schubert
  • Gregory Nelson
Chapter
Part of the Nato ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 154)

Abstract

Some responses of the nematode C. elegans to ultraviolet (UV), high and low LET ionizing radiation are reported. This animal will be part of a dosimetric stack that will fly on a future space shuttle mission. Ten million larval worms will be sent into orbit to measure the effects of the space radiation environment on both the genetic and developmental processes in this biological test system. Here we report on some of the lethal, developmental, and mutational responses of wild type (N2) and five radiation sensitive mutants (rad-1, rad-2, rad-3, rad-4 and rad-7) to UV (254 nm), 60Co γrays, protons, and various high energy sub-atomic ions (HZE’s) generated at the BEVALAC facility. An ideal candidate for studies involving UV is identified (rad-3). Radiation mutant sensitivity, compared to wild type, was not evident for experiments conducted with HZE’s. A suitable mutational tester strain (JP10) has been developed for flight. Whether, in addition, a mutant hypersensitive to HZE’s can be incorporated into this strain before launch is still questionable. C. elegans progeny, produced during the shuttle mission, will be conceived, born, and developed in the space environment.

Keywords

Mercury Agar Argon Pyrimidine Lanthanum 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Coohill
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tamara Marshall
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wayne Schubert
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gregory Nelson
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Physics & AstronomyWestern Kentucky UniversityBowling GreenUSA
  2. 2.Caltech/Jet Propulsion LaboratoryPasadenaUSA

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