Freezing Versus Vitrification; Basic Principles

  • D. E. Pegg
  • M. P. Diaper
Part of the Developments in Hematology and Immunology book series (DIHI, volume 24)

Abstract

The discovery by C. Polge, U.A. Smith and A.S. Parkes in 1948, that glycerol would enable fowl spermatozoa to survive freezing to −70°C [1], initiated a phase of dramatic development in the application of what subsequently came to be called “cryobiology”. It is interesting to note, in the context of this paper, that the title of the paper describing that fundamental observation was “Revival of spermatozoa after vitrification and dehydration at low temperatures”; as we shall see, these experiments did not produce vitrification in the sense that is now meant — in fact, that method would now be termed the “classical freezing” approach. In this paper we shall consider the mechanisms by which the classical freezing method and vitrification seek to preserve the viability of cells, tissues and organs.

Keywords

Permeability Crystallization Toxicity Glycerol Microwave 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. E. Pegg
  • M. P. Diaper

There are no affiliations available

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