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A Rationale for Family Involvement in Long-Term Traumatic Head Injury Rehabilitation

  • Harvey E. Jacobs
Part of the Foundations of Neuropsychology book series (FNPS, volume 3)

Abstract

Advances in medical treatment and rehabilitation have improved outcomes for many survivors of traumatic head injury. Once medical sequelae are controlled however, many survivors face complex problems that preclude the opportunity for self-sufficient living. Newly developing therapies can address some of these issues, but this treatment is not available to all due to cost, geographic location, and the inability to address the broad multitude of problems faced by this population. In the absence of professional treatment, family members frequently find themselves serving as therapists, despite lack of training and problems that they may be experiencing with their own personal adjustment to the catastrophic injury. However, research with other populations of disabled persons has demonstrated that family members can be trained to be effective therapeutic agents to meet a broad range of issues and learn how to advocate for needed services beyond their capabilities. It is likely that this technology can also be used to help meet some of the long-term needs of persons with traumatic head injuries.

Keywords

Head Injury Family Therapy Rehabilitation Medicine Brain Damage Severe Head Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

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  • Harvey E. Jacobs

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