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Body Composition in Cystic Fibrosis

  • K. J. Gaskin
  • D. L. M. Waters
  • V. L. Soutter
  • L. Baur
  • B. J. Allen
  • N. Blagojevic
  • D. Parsons
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 55)

Abstract

Over the last two decades there has been an increasing interest in the nutritional problems of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This situation has arisen from reports (Yassa et al., 1978; Soutter et al., 1986) indicating that stunting and wasting are common, and contrasting reports from the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, cystic fibrosis clinic (Corey, 1980; Corey et al., 1984), demonstrating that their patients conform to the normal distribution for height and, to a lesser extent, weight percentiles. Moreover, the Maintenance of normal nutritional status and growth may have considerably enhanced the prognosis of patients at the Toronto clinic (Corey, 1980) in comparison to other clinics. Consequently, a number of studies have been performed to define the origin of CF malnutrition, its deleterious effect on body composition, growth and lung function, and the possible benefits of nutritional rehabilitation programs. Dietary intake analyses have revealed that most CF patients consume large amounts of protein similar to controls (Soutter et al., 1986). In contrast, due to the almost universal policy of the provision of a low fat diet, a persistent energy deficit has occurred (Roy et al., 1984). The latter has been compounded by the effects of anorexia due to lung, gut and liver disease and drug administration, and possibly excessive energy expenditure related to lung disease, recurrent lung infections and the underlying disease process.

Keywords

Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Patient Malnourished Patient Nutritional Rehabilitation Total Body Potassium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. J. Gaskin
    • 1
  • D. L. M. Waters
    • 1
  • V. L. Soutter
    • 1
  • L. Baur
    • 1
  • B. J. Allen
    • 2
  • N. Blagojevic
    • 2
  • D. Parsons
    • 2
  1. 1.The Children’s HospitalCamperdown, SydneyAustralia
  2. 2.A.N.S.T.OSydneyAustralia

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