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On the Relationship of Plant Geometry to Photosynthetic Response

  • Thomas J. Herbert

Abstract

The chapter by Chazdon et al. (Chapter 1) concerned relationships between the light environment and the photosynthetic response of tropical forest plants. This chapter builds upon these relationships by exploring the dependence of total plant photosynthesis upon orientation and position of photosynthetic surfaces and characteristics of the photosynthetic response. A simple two-dimensional model of an individual plant or plant stand will be used to explore the dependence of total plant photosynthetic rate on plant geometry, particularly with respect to two common characteristics of tropical forest plants and their environment, heliotropism and high solar elevation angles.

Keywords

Photosynthetic Rate Inclination Angle Photosynthetic Response Light Interception Leaf Angle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Chapman & Hall 1996

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  • Thomas J. Herbert

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