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Contribution of meat, fish and poultry to the human diet

  • A. E. Bender
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Meat Research book series (ADMERE, volume 11)

Abstract

There are very many diets in different regions of the world that supply adequate amounts of all the nutrients so long as the quantities of food eaten are sufficient. In the western world, diets are largely based on wheat, meat and milk, in other parts on rice and fish, with some communities relying heavily on single staples such as cassava, maize or potatoes — all supplemented to greatly varying extents with fruit and vegetables. Any discussion of the role of one type of food in the diet is confounded by the amounts consumed. Briggs and Schweigert (1990) quote a fivefold range for the consumption of red meat in the USA between light and heavy eaters (apart, of course, from vegetarians).

Keywords

Fish Product Sulphur Amino Acid Food Composition Table Fatty Fish White Fish 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1997

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  • A. E. Bender

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