Abstract

Cheese manufacture can be defined in relatively simple terms as the removal of moisture from a curd obtained enzymatically or isoelectrically. The process involves the concentration of the main milk components, casein and fat by 6- to 12-fold. This concentration process is regulated by different factors including pH, temperature, time, agitation, etc. The resulting cheese is rubbery and essentially flavourless.

Keywords

Hydrolysis Fermentation Glutathione Proline Lactose 

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References

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  • M. El Soda

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