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Authenticity of coffee

  • J. Prodolliet

Abstract

The coffee tree is an evergreen and roughly pyramidal shrub. It can grow to a height of 3–6 m or more. The leaves, arranged in pairs along the branches, are slender and lance-shaped, with a bright, waxy sheen. The blossoms are white, and smell intensely of jasmine. Coffee itself appears as small, cherrylike berries, deep red when ripe (Kolpas, 1993).

Keywords

Coffee Bean Green Coffee Roasted Coffee Instant Coffee Coffee Husk 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Chapman & Hall 1996

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  • J. Prodolliet

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