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Aids-Related Malignancies

  • Afshin Dowlati
  • Scot C. Remick

Abstract

With the close of the second decade of the AIDS epidemic, it is apparent that the spectrum of neoplasia in the background of underlying HIV infection and acquired immune deficiency remains dynamic. The evolution of primary antiretroviral therapy during this period, especially in more industrially developed portions of the world, has had a great impact on this aspect of the epidemic. Thus, we must reconcile the natural history and therapeutic interventions reported for various AIDS-related malignancies in the context of the evolution of current primary antiretroviral therapy. The highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era dates back to 1996 with the general availability of the protease inhibitors (saquinavir was the first agent of this class to be approved for use in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration in 1995). It is now possible with the emergence of HAART therapies to achieve more sustained elevations in CD4 lymphocyte counts (immunologic response) and near complete suppression of HIV viral load (virologic response). Of these outcome measures, complete response (immunologic and virologic) and immunologic response seem important in achieving at least partial immune restoration, reduction in short-term opportunistic infectious complications, and prolongation of overall survival [1]. Throughout this chapter, in which references to the pre- and post-, or current HAART therapy era are made, the impact of this therapeutic era on malignant complications of HIV disease is elucidated.

Keywords

Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma Acquir Immune Primary Effusion Lymphoma Liposomal Daunorubicin Liposomal Anthracyclines 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Afshin Dowlati
  • Scot C. Remick

There are no affiliations available

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