Range Expansion and Its Genetic Consequences in Populations of the Giant Toad, Bufo marinus

  • Simon Easteal
Part of the Evolutionary Biology book series (EBIO, volume 23)

Abstract

During the past few thousand years there have been major global climatic changes. These have resulted in regional shifts in biotic composition and in alterations of the ranges of many species. These events are sufficiently recent that any effects they had on the populations involved may still be evident. More recently still, other major changes in the distributions of species have occurred as a result of human activities. Many species have been introduced to regions outside their natural range and the distributions of others have been altered through habitat modification. Range alterations may be general and frequent occurrences and their potential effects need to be considered in studying natural populations.

Keywords

Sugar Cellulose Starch Europe Electrophoresis 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon Easteal
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Genetics Group, John Curtin School of Medical ResearchAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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