Mental Retardation

Psychological Therapies
  • Johannes Rojahn
  • Jennifer Burkhart
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series

Abstract

The human condition of mentally retarded persons has historically lingered in the shadow of society’s attention. The relative concern about these people has increased considerably in many countries, specifically since the end of World War II. However, a number of problems remain to be addressed. One problem area is mental health care for mentally retarded children and adolescents, which has only recently become duly recognized (e.g., Matson, 1985b; Matson & Barrett, 1982; Menolascino & Stark, 1985).

Keywords

Placebo Depression Selan Immobilization Tate 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Johannes Rojahn
    • 1
  • Jennifer Burkhart
    • 1
  1. 1.Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA

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