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Anxiety and Phobias

Psychological Therapies
  • Thomas R. Kratochwill
  • Anna Accardi
  • Richard J. Morris
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series

Abstract

Virtually all theoretical models or approaches to human behavior have dealt with children’s fears, phobias, or anxieties. Independent of theoretical orientation, fear is generally regarded as a basic human emotion that leads individuals to take protective action and that results in cognitive, behavioral, or physiological responses. All children experience fears that do not interfere with their daily functioning. In fact, these fears are typically viewed as an intregal part of normal development across most major theories of child development (Jersild, 1968; Jersild & Holmes, 1935; Morris & Kratochwill, 1983; Smith, 1979).

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Classical Conditioning Separation Anxiety Psychological Therapy Phobic Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas R. Kratochwill
    • 1
  • Anna Accardi
    • 1
  • Richard J. Morris
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Educational Psychology, School Psychology ProgramUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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