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Biological Monitoring of Cadmium

  • Gunnar F. Nordberg
  • Monica Nordberg
Chapter
Part of the Rochester Series on Environmental Toxicity book series (RSET)

Abstract

For an understanding of the possibilities and needs for biological monitoring of cadmium, it is necessary to briefly review occurrence in the environment. The main part of this review, however, will deal with the metabolic model of cadmium and the possibilities of accurate analysis in biological media. More detailed reviews are available (Friberg et al., 1985, 1986a,b).

Keywords

Cadmium Concentration Body Burden Biological Monitoring Metabolic Model Cadmium Exposure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gunnar F. Nordberg
    • 1
  • Monica Nordberg
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Environmental MedicineUmea UniversityUmeaSweden
  2. 2.Department of Environmental HygieneKarolinska InstituteStockholmSweden

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