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Tombusviruses

  • G. P. Martelli
  • D. Gallitelli
  • M. Russo
Part of the The Viruses book series (VIRS)

Abstract

The Tombusvirus group was established in 1971 (Harrison et al. 1971). It derives its name from the sigla “tombus,” originating from the name of the type member of the group, tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV).

Keywords

Coat Protein Virus Particle Plant Virus Ringspot Virus Tomato Bushy Stunt Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. P. Martelli
    • 1
  • D. Gallitelli
    • 1
  • M. Russo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant PathologyUniversity of BariBariItaly

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