Reductive Procedures

  • Francis E. LentzJr.

Abstract

This chapter will review the issues and effects of externally managed behavioral procedures applied to the reduction of undesirable behavior of regular or mildly handicapped children in school settings. Although there is a recognized overlap between classification categories, the examination of interventions in similar settings, with similar goals and objectives, similar populations, and similar procedures for instruction creates a more defined dimension for generalizable conclusions. Further, this type of review may provide an overview currently missing in the literature.

Keywords

Peri Stein Rosen Kelly Tempo 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francis E. LentzJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.College of EducationUniversity of CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA

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